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CURTIS KNIGHT (& THE SQUIRES)



Live recordings
The live recordings of Curtis Knight & the Squires (aka the Lovelights) have been causing a huge amount of head scratching for collectors since they first started to appear in 1970. For starters there has been uncertainty whether they are live recordings at all as two tracks, "Last Night" and "Killing Floor", are available in two versions:  with crowd noise, and completely without. This suggested that they might have originally been studio takes (or live takes recorded at a club without an audience present) which later received audience noise overdubs. This possibility of course cast doubt over all the other tracks as well.

The first official compilation of these recordings without overdubs and added studio trickery, "Live At George’s Club 20", is set for cd release in March 2017 on the mail-order only Dagger Records -label. Being able to hear the original recordings will no doubt make it necessary to once again rewrite this page but in anticipation of that I've now already updated the text with all of the information currently available.

DATE AND LOCATION
After Experience Hendrix purchased Ed Chalpin`s masters in 2014 John McDermott has been able to examine the various available tapes in the Chalpin archives 25. The original tape boxes for the master recordings of the live tracks no longer exist but the various copy masters, mixes and edits feature notations with two different dates mentioned, 26 December 1965 and 22 January 1966. McDermott has been able to confirm that the tapes were indeed recorded live over two dates (as already speculated since some tracks exist in two versions with different instrumentation) at the now famous George`s Club 20 in Hackensack, New Jersey.

Based on the release dates of the original versions of the songs covered by the band I'd previously dated the recordings to have been made between late 1965 - January 1966: "Day Tripper" and "Get Out Of My Life, Woman" are the newest songs on the tapes, both were released in the USA in December 1965. As the band was playing exclusively covers and the set included many songs released in 1965 one can conclude the emphasis was on recent chart material, hence the newest songs are likely to have been released quite close to the recording date(s) of these tracks rather than months later.

The dates found on the tape boxes match the deducted time frame perfectly. So unless someone made a mistake or deliberately misdated the recordings on the boxes (which can never be completely ruled out as all of this information is 2nd hand with the original boxes missing) the mystery of how many dates were recorded and when has now finally been solved.

The location, George's Club 20, was mentioned during an introduction preceding "Killing Floor". The band was also photographed at the club (see pictures), all players in these photographs also appear on the recordings - though not in the precisely same combination so the pictures are not from the exact time of recording.

What is querious though is the way the introduction  to "Killing Floor" unfolded:

CK: "Like to let everyone know that you're being recorded, this is being recorded live here at the fabulous George's Club 20, in Hackensack New Jersey. You'll...stop laughing Jimmy."
JH: "Fabulous..."
CK: "You're listening to...that's, pretty boy Jimmy James over there laughing (laughs)."

Jimi's sarcastic laughing and reaction to Curtis calling the club "fabulous" is odd - seems highly unlikely that this would have taken place on stage in front of a live audience and the club personnel so I've in the past considered this evidence that the recording wasn't really made live. It might also indicate that the tapes were made after hours or before the club opened since the introduction & and "Killing Floor" which follows have no audible audience noise. I'll have to wait and see what the raw tapes can tell us as based on the tracklist both tracks will be included on the upcoming cd.

Band Line-up
The pre-release publicity for the "Live At George’s Club 20" release suggests that the band appeared as the Lovelights on both dates. This was already confirmed for one of the dates (as Curtis introduces the band as the Lovelights during "Band Outro"), it's at the moment unknown if there is actual recorded or written evidence backing up the use of the name the Lovelights also for the other recorded date.

We have two tracks that feature band introductions, "Band Outro" and "Come On - Part 1", so the personnel on these tracks is know - apart from the problem that neither track nor the introductions include Lonnie Youngblood while his playing and singing is clearly audible on several. This has caused a lot of grief when trying to determine the band line-up.

Why Lonnie's name seems to be completely missing is an interesting question. He plays and sings on several songs yet none of the currently available versions of those tracks have any kind of introductions by him or others, nor is Lonnie's name mentioned during the band introductions by Curtis and Jimi. It is possible that Lonnie just did guest spots during a few songs and wasn't a "full member" of the band. Or that simply by accident none of the recordings have him talking or his name mentioned but it seems very unlikely. Any introductions or stage chat that did mention him may have been deliberately edited out for contractual reasons by Chalpin, again the unaltered tapes will hopefully tell us more.

It is now confirmed that the tapes were made over two days, it was always assumed that there was more than one recording date since 6 songs exist in two different versions: "I Got You (I Feel Good)", "I'll Be Doggone", "I'm A Man", "Killing Floor", "Money (That's What I Want)", "Travelin' To California". The logical conclusion would be that there were two concerts with these 6 songs played in both sets, hence the duplication. Unfortunately Lonnie Youngblood and his sax again become a problem at this point. Here's a list indicating which duplicate songs feature sax:

"I Got You (I Feel Good)" - version 1 - with sax
"I Got You (I Feel Good)" - version 2 - with sax

"I'll Be Doggone" - version 1 - with sax
"I'll Be Doggone" - version 2 - no sax

"I'm A Man" - version 1 - with sax
"I'm A Man" - version 2 - no sax

"Killing Floor" - version 1 - with sax
"Killing Floor" - version 2 - no sax

"Money (That's What I Want)" - version 1 - no sax
"Money (That's What I Want)" - version 2 - no sax

"Travelin' To California" - version 1 - with sax
"Travelin' To California" - version 2 - no sax

The tracks would neatly divide into two groups, one line-up / gig with a sax player and another line-up / gig without , if it wasn't for the fact that both versions of "I Got You (I Feel Good)" feature sax. Which in turn suggested that there may have been three different gigs / tapes, not just two. If just one tape / gig had Lonnie playing sax then both takes of "I Got You (I Feel Good)" would have to be on it, why would the band have performed the same song twice during one gig?

The fact that we now have the information that there were only two recordings favours the theory that Lonnie was in the band for one of the gigs and wasn't there for the other. Seems very unlikely that if he was there both times he would play sax on four of the duplicate tracks at one gig and then not play on them at the other, there's no logical reason for such a change. It's much more likely that Lonnie was in the band for one of the gigs and wasn't there for the other. So why then two versions of "I Got You (I Feel Good)", both with sax?

One of the versions is incomplete, cut very shortly after it starts. Perhaps the band made a mistake, stopped playing and started again? Or did the tape ran out and whoever was manning the recording deck noticed this and asked the band to play the song again? These explanations are also a bit questionable as there are other tracks that are cut or fade out with no duplicate versions, nobody seem to have been paying attention whether there was enough tape left. So this mystery still remains unsolved for now, whether Lonnie Youngblood played in that band at both gigs or just one cannot be determined at the moment, hopefully this question will also be answered soon.

So, we seem to have these two line-ups performing on the recordings:

Line-up 1: The Lovelights

vocals: Curtis Knight
guitar: Jimi Hendrix
guitar: Harry Jensen
bass: Ace Hall
drums: Ditto Edwards
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

This line-up information comes from the introduction that Curtis makes during "Band Outro":

CK: "Ah yeah. What a fast 40 minutes. You've been listening to the music of the Lovelights. Featuring: Handsome Harry on lead guitar, ha, good looking Ditto on the drums. The fabulous Jimmy James. Long tall handsome Ace on the bass. Yours truly Curtis Knight here. We're gonna take a short break but we'll be right back, ???? right right back, yeah."

Lonnie Youngblood isn't mentioned but there are some faintly audible sax parts buried under the rest of the band if you listen very carefully.

Harry (Jensen) is introduced on lead guitar so this tape probably is the older recording of the two, Jimi isn't a "star" yet and the band is called the Lovelights instead of the Squires. Though there is no proof that the live band ever actually gigged as the Squires, the only known gig ad, for Cheetah 1966, only mentions "Curtiss Night". None of the other musicians (besides Curtis & Jimi) playing here signed the contract with RSVP in June 1966 which also suggests that this recording was made months earlier. And, none of the available pictures of the band show Harry Jensen or any other guitar players on stage apart from Jimi & Curtis. If this tape indeed is the older one that would make it the 26 December 1965 recording.

Line-up 2: The Lovelights (?)
vocals: Curtis Knight & Jimi Hendrix
tambourine: Ace Hall
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: Curtis Knight?
bass: Harry Jensen
drums: George Bragg
sax?: Lonnie Youngblood?

This line -up information comes from the introduction that Jimi makes during "Come On - Part 1":

JH (ad lib from c.1.56 onwards): "Play on George"
JH: "Hey hey hey"
CK: "Hey hey hey"
JH: "Yea ye ye"
CK: "Yea yea"
JH: "Ye Ye Yeah"
CK: "Ye Ye Ye"
JH: "Hey hey hey"
CK: "Hey hey hey"
JH: "We got George on the drums"
CK: "George on the drums"
JH: "Harry on the bass"
CK: "Harry on the bass"
JH: "Ace playing the tambourine"
CK: "Ace playing the tambourine"
JH: "And a, you know [mumble]"

There is rhythm guitar on the track but whoever is playing it isn't introduced, nor is Curtis Knight so it might be him on guitar, most of the live pictures of the band show him on stage playing one. The name of the band isn't mentioned. Lonnie Youngblood isn't mentioned nor is there any sax audible on this track. This may be the line-up for the 22 January 1966 date.

MOTIVATION
Why were the tapes made? The recordings are not professional quality so one would assume the gigs were recorded just for the band to listen to, Curtis however makes an interesting introduction to one of the songs:

CK: "You're being recorded live, we're making an album right here... fabulous Club 20 in Hackensack, New Jersey.

Curtis may have been creating an "authentic" live recording atmosphere just for fun, or the band could have been seriously considering making a live lp. Or the tapes may have been made for booking purposes, to get the band more gigs. The recordings would not have been of sufficient quality for official release so Curtis` comment is puzzling - unless he made it in good faith before anyone actually knew what the end result would sound like.

THE SONGS
Here follows a listing of all of the available tracks.

In the past I've made numerous attempts at dividing the tracks into two or three groups based on the tape versions of the tracks where some songs actually run into each other, listening to the performances and the introductions, listening to the sound quality, mix and instrumentation, all in vain. The changes in instrumentation, different mixes, overdubs, splicing etc. manage to very successfully hide any easily definable characteristics for either recording.  Hopefully the new release will bring clarity into this matter and it will finally be possible to assign each track to a known date and line-up.

For now I'll however list them in alphabetical order, with dates and personnel (in the rare cases when there's any certainty of them), transcriptions of the introductions and relevant mid-song ad libs. Also included is discographical information about the original versions of the songs being covered. While already looking forward to rewriting everything on this page...

Jimi must have had a lot to do with the selection of the tracks as these clearly were songs that he liked: he later performed live, recorded his own studio versions or made home recordings of at least 7 of them: "Bleeding Heart", "Bright Lights, Big City", "Come On - Part 1", "Day Tripper", "Driving South", "Killing Floor" and "Mercy, Mercy".


Ain't That Peculiar
composers: William "Smokey" Robinson, Marvin Tarplin, Robert Rogers & Warren Moore
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix
tambourine: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH?: "???"
CK: "Ain't That Pe-CU-liar. This is for you, baby, Carol."

Released by Marvin Gaye on the 45 "Ain't That Peculiar / She's Got To Be Real" (Tamla 54122) in September 1965 5. Made #1 on the R&B and #8 on the Hot 100 Billboard charts.


Baby What You Want Me To Do

aka You Got Me Running
date: Sunday 26 December 1965
composer: Jimmy Reed
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix?
tambourine: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "Well all right! We're gonna do a little thing, a little Jimmy Reed thing, talkin' about... you know what I'm sayin', here we go, Jimmy Reed.

There's a tape source on which "Driving South" goes directly into "Baby What You Want Me To Do" without an audible cut between songs. The Dagger Records "Live At George’s Club 20" cd tracklisting also includes both of the tracks and in the same order. Hence "Baby What You Want Me To Do" dates from 26 December 1965 (the date is mentioned in the introduction to "Driving South").

Jimmy Reed`s original 78 / 45 "Baby What You Want Me To Do / Caress Me Baby" (Vee-Jay Records VJ 333) was released in November 1959 27 (R&B #10, Pop #37).


Band Outro

composer(s): unknown
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
rhythm guitar: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Harry Jensen
bass: Ace Hall
drums: Ditto Edwards

CK: "Ah yeah. What a fast 40 minutes. You've been listening to the music of the Lovelights. Featuring: Handsome Harry on lead guitar, ha, good looking Ditto on the drums. The fabulous Jimmy James. Long tall handsome Ace on the bass. Yours truly Curtis Knight here. We're gonna take a short break but we'll be right back, ???? right right back, yeah."


Bleeding Heart

aka "My Bleeding Heart"
date: unknown
composer: Elmore James
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
tambourine: Curtis Knight?
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH: "Two, Three..."

(incomplete, track runs to c. 2.00, then a repeat section has been patched in and faded out)

There are multiple 1960s 45 & lp releases of this track on various labels so it's hard to determine the chronology of releases. If not the first then one of the first was this 45:

Elmore James 45 "Bleeding Heart / It Hurts Me Too" (Enjoy 2015) USA 1965? 41

Other releases are also available, I have not been able to find out which of these came out when:

Elmore James 45 "Bleeding Heart / Mean Mistreatin` Mama" (Enjoy 2020) USA 1965? 41
Elmore James 45 "My Bleeding Heart / One Way Out" (Sphere Sound SSR 702) 1965?
Elmo James lp "The Sky Is Crying" (Sphere Sound LP 7002) 1965?

Jimi was photographed in London in 1967 holding a copy of a Elmore James - Memorial Album (Sue Records ILP-927) UK lp, it's however very probable that he had bought it after he arrived in London, with this many different releases it's not possible to say which one Jimi originally first heard.


Bo Diddley (Medley)
composer: Ellas McDaniel aka Bo Diddley
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
tambourine: unknown
harmony vocals: Curtis Knight
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

This track is actually a medley of three different Bo Diddley songs (ID by R.MacNeill):

First verse:
from "Bo Diddley", B-side of Bo Diddley's first 78 / 45, "I'm A Man / Bo Diddley" (Checker Record Co. 814) released in March 1955 28 and re-issued as Checker 997 in 1961.

Second & third verse
from "Hush Your Mouth", A-side of the 45 "Hush Your Mouth / Dearest Darling" (Checker 896) released in June 1958. 29

Harmony vocals:
from "Hey! Bo-Diddley", A-side of the 78 / 45 "Hey! Bo-Diddley / Mona" (Checker Recording Co. 860) released in March / April 1957. 30


Bright Lights, Big City
composer: Jimmy Reed
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown (may be an overdub?)
bass: unknown (may be an overdub?)
drums: unknown (may be an overdub?)

intro
CK: "Bright Lights, and Big Cities, ya'll."

JH (ad lib at c. 2.01): "You all know what it's about baby. The snow was on the ground"
CK?: "Ha, tell us!"
JH: "You better watch what you're doin`. I'm a man that's been true to you ...messing around"

Released by Jimmy Reed on the 45 "Bright Lights, Big City / I’m Mr. Luck" (Vee-Jay Records VJ 398) in early August 1961 9.


Come On - Part 1
aka Let The Good Times Roll
composer: Earl King
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix & Curtis Knight
tambourine: Ace Hall
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: Curtis Knight?
bass: Harry Jensen
drums: George Bragg

intro
JH: "The name of this tune is, the name of this tune is so fucking e...two, one."

JH (ad lib from c.1.56 onwards): "Play on George"
JH: "Hey hey hey"
CK: "Hey hey hey"
JH: "Yea ye ye"
CK: "Yea yea"
JH: "Ye Ye Yeah"
CK: "Ye Ye Ye"
JH: "Hey hey hey"
CK: "Hey hey hey"
JH: "We got George on the drums"
CK: "George on the drums"
JH: "Harry on the bass"
CK: "Harry on the bass"
JH: "Ace playing the tambourine"
CK: "Ace playing the tambourine"
JH: "And a, you know [mumble]"

(track fades out - but the audience noise doesn't!)

The song is played as an instrumental intro or outro with Jimi introducing the band members. Original version by Earl King was released on the 45 "Come On - Part 1 / Come On - Part 2" (Imperial 5713) in 1960. Also released by Alvin Robinson on the 45 "Bottom Of My Soul / Let The Good Times Roll" (Blue Cat BC 113) in April 1965 22. Jimi's later 1968 cover (as released on Electric Ladyland) is clearly based on the Earl King version but it is possible that Jimi was also familiar with the Alvin Robinson recording as the Squires also played "Something You Got", a hit for Alvin Robinson (as mentioned by Jimi in the introduction for the song).


Day Tripper
composers: John Lennon & Paul McCartney
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight & Jimi Hendrix
tambourine: Curtis Knight?
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

The single "We Can Work It Out / Day Tripper" (Capitol 5555) by the Beatles was released in the USA on 1 December 1965 12.


Driving South

aka Drivin` South aka Thaw-Out
date: Sunday 26 December 1965
composer: Albert Collins (& Jimi Hendrix)
vocals: Curtis Knight
tambourine: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro [riffs]
CK: "Yeah! Right now we're gonna feature Jimmy James. Jimmy's gonna do a little tune for you, of his own selection. You're gonna like it. Gonna feature Jimmy here. What're you gonna do for the people, Jimmy, on Christmas plus one?"
JH: "Little thing called Drivin' South."
CK: "A little thing called Driving South."
JH: "In D, ya'll know ."
CK: "In D."
JH: "One."
CK: "If you ain't never been there, you're gonna take a trip with us now, baby. If you ain't got no car, put on some skates."
JH: "Get 99 pairs of shoes and walk the rest of the way! Lawd have mercy, ya'll ready? One, two..."

outro
CK: "How bout it, ladies and gentlemen? Take a bow, Jimmy! That's an original tune wrote by Jimmy, a little thing entitled - written, I should say, wrote, written, written, wrote... called Drivin' South, going home where they got sweet potatoes, fatback, and things. Down there where all the soul food and all the swingin' people come from. Can I get a witness to that? Is anybody from down there besides me?"

There's a tape source on which "Driving South" goes directly into "Baby What You Want Me To Do" without an audible cut between songs. The Dagger Records "Live At George’s Club 20" cd tracklisting also includes both of the tracks and in the same order.

Although Hendrix performed this track throughout his career under the title "Driving South" it's in reality a cover of "Thaw-Out" by Albert Collins. The original was an instrumental, the Squires have added vocals to the track. Jimi recorded the track for the BBC in 1967 and played it live in 1968 and 1969. The track title, "Driving South", was most likely Jimi's as one of the BBC versions was introduced by Alexis Korner with the same title, obviously after being told what the title was so Jimi kept using it later with the Experience.

Released by Albert Collins on the 45 "Thaw-Out / Backstroke" (Hall Records 45-1925) in 1964 and on the lp "The Cool Sound Of Albert Collins" (TCF 8002) in November 1965. 31


Get Out Of My Life, Woman
composer: Allen Toussaint
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

Intro
JH: "B sharp, B. One ..."

First released by Lee Dorsey on the 45 "Get Out Of My Life, Woman / So Long" (Amy 945) in December 1965 10.


Hang On Sloopy
composer: Bert Russell (Bert Berns) & Wes Farrell
date: unknown
vocals 1st verse: Curtis Knight
vocals 2nd verse: Jimi Hendrix
harmony vocals: Curtis Knight & Jimi Hendrix
tambourine: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "Gonna do a tune for ya. Hang On..."
JH: "Say something else in there."
CK: "Sloopy."
JH: "G"

Released by the McCoys on the 45 "Hang on Sloopy / I Can't Explain it" (Bang B-506) in August 1965 11.


Hold What You've Got
composer: Joe Tex
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "All right, we're gonna do a little Joe Tex tune here... You'd better Hold on to What You Got, baby. If you got anything to hold on to, that is."

Released on the Joe Tex 45 "Hold What You've Got / Fresh Out Of Tears" (Dial 45-4001) in November 1964. 32


(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction
composers: Mick Jagger & Keith Richard
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: Harry Jensen
drums: George Bragg

intro
CK: "Continuing on, we're gonna do a tune made popular by the Rolling Stones. A very fabulous British group. We're British, also."
JH: "West Indies."
CK: "West British, South British."
JH: "British West Indies."
CK: (laughs)
JH: "That's down there close to Georgia, isn't it? Isn't it down there close to - "
CK: "That's pretty close to Georgia. A little tune entitled I Can't Get None."

JH (ad lib at c. 4.01): "Bring it on(?) George, play on(?)" (during drum break)

outro
CK: "Oh yeah, a little bit of I Can't Get None."

With George on drums so this is the same line-up that is introduced during "Come On - Part 1".

Released by the Rolling Stones in the USA on the 45 "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction / The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man" (London 9766) in June 1965 16.


I Can't Help Myself
aka Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch
composers: Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier & Edward Holland
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "All right, a tune made popular by the ever-popular Four Tops. It was Number One in the nation, not too far back. We'd like to give you our rendition of..."
JH: "One, two, one two three four."

The original single by the Four Tops, "I Can't Help Myself / Sad Souvenirs" (Motown 1076) was released in April 1965. 33 It made number 1 on the Cash Box Top 100 singles chart week ending June 19, 1965.


I Got You (I Feel Good)

composer: James Brown
date: unknown
vocals: Lonnie Youngblood
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

(track cuts out)

The James Brown & Famous Flames 45 "I Got You (I Feel Good) / I Can't Help It (I Just Do-Do-Do)" (King 6015) was released in late October 1965 13.


I Got You (I Feel Good)

composer: James Brown
date: unknown
vocals: Lonnie Youngblood
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

The James Brown & Famous Flames 45 "I Got You (I Feel Good) / I Can't Help It (I Just Do-Do-Do)" (King 6015) was released in late October 1965 13.


I'll Be Doggone

composers: William "Smokey" Robinson, Warren Moore & Marvin Tarplin
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
tambourine: unknown
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "Gonna do a Marvin Gaye tune, ladies and gentlemen. I'll Be Doggone!"

Released by Marvin Gaye on the 45 "I'll Be Doggone / You've Been A Long Time Coming" (Tamla 54112) in March 1965. 18


I'll Be Doggone
composers: William "Smokey" Robinson, Warren Moore & Marvin Tarplin
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
tambourine: unknown
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
drums: unknown (audible at lower volume under the overdubs)
bass: unknown (inaudible because of the overdubs)
sax: Lonnie Youngblood
overdubbed bass: unknown
overdubbed drums: unknown

(track fades out)

This track may well exist somewhere without the overdubs, it seems to be the only track with no unaltered version available? Released by Marvin Gaye on the 45 "I'll Be Doggone / You've Been A Long Time Coming" (Tamla 54112) in March 1965. 18


I'm A Man

composer: Ellas McDaniel aka Bo Diddley
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH: "Ok then, ya'll, here we go"

A-side of Bo Diddley's first 78 / 45, "I'm A Man / Bo Diddley" (Checker Record Co. 814) released in March 1955 28 and re-issued as Checker 997 in 1961.


I'm A Man
composer: Ellas McDaniel aka Bo Diddley
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

JH (ad lib at c. 4.27): "It's all right baby, to do it tonight. The snow is coming down, still had no reason for being around... what I say now"

A-side of Bo Diddley's first 78 / 45, "I'm A Man / Bo Diddley" (Checker Record Co. 814) released in March 1955 28 and re-issued as Checker 997 in 1961.


Just A Little Bit

composer: Rosco Gordon
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

Released by Rosco Gordon on the 45 "Just A Little Bit / Goin´ Home" (Vee Jay Records VJ 332) in January 1960 14.


Killing Floor

composer: Chester Burnett aka Howlin` Wolf
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

B-side of the Howlin` Wolf 45 "Louise / Killing Floor" (Chess 1923) released in March 1965 15.


Killing Floor

composer: Chester Burnett aka Howlin` Wolf
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH: ?
CK: "Alright, here we go"
?: "One two"
CK: "Like to let everyone know that you're being recorded, this is being recorded live here at the fabulous George's Club 20, in Hackensack New Jersey. You'll...stop laughing Jimmy."
JH: "Fabulous..."
CK: "You're listening to...that's, pretty boy Jimmy James over there laughing (laughs).
? : "Now that's funny"
CK: "He's bashful (laughs). Er, we're gonna get things underway with a tune entitled what's the name of it Jimmy? (laughs)
JH: "???, ok let me see"
CK: "What's the name of it?"
JH: "Killing Floor, Killing Floor"
CK: "Killing Floor. On the Killing Floor"
JH: "??? how I would be walking it down for you"

outro
CK: "Oh yeah, a little thing entitled On The Killing Floor ya`all"

This is clearly the start of a recording, someone tests the mic with "one two" and Curtis makes an introduction about the concert being recorded.

B-side of the Howlin` Wolf 45 "Louise / Killing Floor" (Chess 1923) released in March 1965 15.


Land Of 1000 Dances
aka Land Of A Thousand Dances
composer: Chris Kenner
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
harmony vocals: Curtis Knight? & unknown
tambourine: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH: "The drums! One, two, rock and roll, one two three."

First released by Chris Kenner on the single "Land Of 1000 Dances / That's My Girl" (Instant Records 3252) in June 1963 20. Cannibal And The Headhunters added the "na na na na na" -chorus to the song and released their version on the single "Land Of 1000 Dances / I'll Show You How To Love Me" (Rampart 642) in early February 1965 19. It's the Cannibal And The Headhunters -version that the Squires covered as the nowadays best known version released by Wilson Pickett on the 45 "Land Of 1000 Dances / You're So Fine" (Atlantic 45-2348) came out later in September 1966 21.


Last Night

composer: Mar-Keys
date: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "Alright, continuing on, we're gonna do a tune, it's very popular. Little tune entitled..."
JH: "Big (legged?) woman ??? I was checking her ??? ok here we go"
CK: "...Last Night."
JH: "In G, G, one, two, three, four"

Released by the Mar-Keys on the 45 "Last Night / Night Before" (Satellite S-107) in April / May 1961. 34


Let's Go, Let's Go, Let's Go
composer: Hank Ballard
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "All right, wake up."

Released by Hank Ballard And The Midnighters on the 45 "Let's Go, Let's Go, Let's Go / If You'd Forgive Me" (King 45-5400) on 10 September 1960 4.


Mercy, Mercy
composer: Don Covay & Horace Ott or Ronald Miller
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix
tambourine: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH?: "What's the number over there, the number that ??? wanna hear"

outro
JH?: "Yeah!"

Don Covay & the Goodtimers released the 45 "Mercy, Mercy / Can't Stay Away" (Rosemart 45-801) in August 1964. 35 See the "Don Covay" -section of this site.


Money (That's What I Want)
composers: Janie Bradford & Berry Gordy, Jr.
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "Continuing on, we're gonna do a song that's a subject that everybody is... it's a controversial subject, as a matter of fact. It's something everybody needs. Money."

Released by Barrett Strong on the 45 "Money (That's What I Want) / Oh I Apologize" (Anna Records 1111) circa December 1959 7. Covered by many people since but the best known cover version at the time of these live recordings probably was by the Beatles, released in the US on the lp "The Beatles` Second Album" (Capitol Capitol T 2080 (M) and ST 2080 (S)) in early April 1964 8


Money (That's What I Want)

composers: Janie Bradford & Berry Gordy, Jr.
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
tambourine: unknown
harmony vocals: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "All right, we're gonna continue on. We're gonna do a tune I think you might remember and enjoy. It's a tune that's pretty appropriate, entitled Money."
JH: "Lawd have mercy, we're gonna do a thing, Money, and one, two, one two three four."

outro
CK: "Oh yeah, a little thing called Money."

Released by Barrett Strong on the 45 "Money (That's What I Want) / Oh I Apologize" (Anna Records 1111) circa December 1959 7. Covered by many people since but the best known cover version at the time of these live recordings probably was by the Beatles, released in the US on the lp "The Beatles` Second Album" (Capitol Capitol T 2080 (M) and ST 2080 (S)) in early April 1964 8


Mr. Pitiful

composer: Otis Redding & Steve Cropper
date: unknown
vocals: Lonnie Youngblood
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

(track fades out)

Released on the B-side of the Otis Redding 45 "That's How Strong My Love Is / Mr. Pitiful" (Volt V-124) in January 1965. 36


One Night

aka One Night With You aka One Night (Of Sin)
composers: Dave Bartholomew & Pearl King (& Elvis Presley? - lyrics)
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

Originally released by Smiley Lewis as "One Night (Of Sin)" on Imperial IM-942 but the well known version is by Elvis Presley released on the 78 / 45 "One Night / I Got Stung" (RCA Victor 47-7410) in October / November 1958. 37 The Elvis version has re-written lyrics but retains the original writing credits.


Shotgun
composer: Autry DeWalt
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: unknown
rhythm guitar: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Harry Jensen
bass: Ace Hall
drums: Ditto Edwards

intro
CK?: "Ditto you got it"
CK (ad lib at c. 2.17): "I said we're going down to Club 20 just to play the blues"

Released by Jr. Walker & The All Stars on the 45 "Shotgun / Hot Cha" (Soul S-35008) in January 1965. 38


Something You Got
composer: Chris Kenner
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH: "Right now we're gonna do one of them little Alvin Robinson tunes, a little thing called Something You Got, in D-flat."

Originally recorded by Chris Kenner, the version Hendrix is referring to in his introduction was released by Alvin Robinson in April 1964 on the 45 "Something You Got / Searchin' " (Tiger TI-104).39


Stand By Me

composer: Ben E. King & Glick
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

Released by Ben E. King on the 45 "Stand By Me / On The Horizon" (Atco 45-6194) in April 1961 17.


Sweet Little Angel
composer: Smith - or - Robert McCullum - or - B.B.King
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
CK: "We're gonna slow things down a bit for all the lovers. I'm gonna dedicate this to my lady. A little tune entitled "I Got a Sweet Little Angel". This is for you, Carol."
JH: "One, two, three."

"Sweet Little Angel" goes directly into "Driving South", there is no continuous source available but it's possible to edit the tracks together.

A cover of a B.B.King track, B.B. based the song on "Sweet Black Angel" by The Nighthawks (vocal by Robert McCullum aka Robert Nighthawk) who in turn based it on "Black Angel Blues" by Lucille Bogan. The original B.B.King 45 & 78 issues credit the track to "King-Josea". There however never existed a person named "Josea", this was a pseudonym used by the Bihari brothers (along with "Taub" and "Ling"), owners of the RM Records label. They included themselves in the composer credits, a common practice at the time giving them a cut of the publishing. 23

First released by B.B. "Blues Boy" King And His Orchestra on the 45 & 78 "Sweet Little Angel / Bad Luck" (RPM Records 45-468 & 78-468) in August 1956 23, a different take was released on the lp B.B.King  lp "Singin`The Blues" (Crown CLP 5020) in June 1957 23 and a live version was released on the lp "Live At The Regal" (ABC-Paramount LP 509) in February 1965 24, recorded live at the Regal Theatre, Chicago, Illinois, 21 November 1964.

The Squires version is most likely mainly based on the  "Live At The Regal" -version. It starts with an instrumental introduction that is much longer than on the B.B. studio versions but very similar in length and style to the intro on the "Live At Regal" -version which also was the most recent issue of the track at the time, less than a year old. The Squires version however is not a straight cover of any of the B.B.King recordings.The first two verses follow the lyrics of the B.B.King version very closely. The third verse is a repeat of the first verse, B.B.King does not repeat the verse so this is the Squires own arrangement. But the biggest difference is in the fourth verse, it isn't a part of the original song at all:

"I said I woke up, woke up this morning now
Tears was running down my baby`s eyes
I said I woke up, I woke up this morning yeah now
And tears was running down my baby`s face
She said she was crying cause I weren't in the bed beside her
And you know, you know that's a man's place now - Hey!"

This last verse would seem to be original material, searching for the lyrics doesn't give any matches at all. An unknown blues track is of course another possibility but based on current evidence the last verse was probably composed by Curtis Knight or another member of the Squires.


There Is Something On Your Mind
composer: ("Big Jay" Cecil James McNeely)
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

CK (before the guitar solo): "Play the blues for me Jimmy James!"

Original version released by Big Jay McNeely and Band (vocal by Little Sonny) as a single "There Is Something On Your Mind / ...Back...Shack...Track" (Swingin' Record Co. 45-614) in May 1959. 40 McNeely was a pioneering sax player in the 50s music scene, so the inclusion of this song in the Squires live set might well have been wholly or partly Lonnie Youngblood's initiative, in addition to the fact that it had been a big hit. King Curtis also performed the song, a live recording from 1966 appears on the lp "Live at Small's Paradise", recorded the same year that Hendrix was a member of Curtis's backing band the Kingpins, so Jimi might well also have played this song with King Curtis.


Travelin' To California
aka California Night
composer: Albert King
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH: ""This goes out to all the soul folks out there, I hear you all making a lot of noise out there. Go ahead on, have yourself a party. Goes something like this here: (beat back?) one, two, three"

JH (ad lib at c.4.11): "Gotta ??? of Booga Bear"

Urbandictionary.com defines "Booga Bear" as "an unattractive woman who is unaware that she is extremely ugly."

Released by Albert King on the 45 “Travelin` To California / Dyna Flow” (Bobbin 130) in 1961, the 45 “Travelin` To California / Dyna Flow” (King 45-5588) in 1962 and the lp "The Big Blues" (King 852) in 1962.


Travelin' To California

aka California Night
composer: Albert King
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

(track fades out)

Released by Albert King on the 45 “Travelin` To California / Dyna Flow” (Bobbin 130) in 1961, the 45 “Travelin` To California / Dyna Flow” (King 45-5588) in 1962 and the lp "The Big Blues" (King 852) in 1962.


Twist And Shout

composers: Phil Medley & Bert Russell
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: unknown
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: unknown
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

This track has what sounds like bad connection noises in the background.

Released by the Isley Brothers (the instrumental B-side is credited to "The I.B. Special") on the 45 "Twist And Shout / Spanish Twist" (Wand 124) in May 1962 3.


Walking The Dog
aka Walkin' The Dog
composer: Rufus Thomas
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown
sax: Lonnie Youngblood

Released by Rufus Thomas on the 45 "Walking The Dog / You Said" (Stax S-140) in September 1963 1.


What'd I Say

composer: Ray Charles
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix
harmony vocals: Curtis Knight
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
bass: unknown
drums: unknown

intro
JH: "Right now we're gonna do a little thing by Ray Charles called What'd I Say, goes like something like this here..."

Released by Ray Charles and His Orchestra on the 45 & 78 "What'd I Say - part I  / What'd I Say - part II" (Atlantic 45-2031 and Atlantic 2031) in 1959.


Wooly Bully

composer: Domingo Samudio
date: unknown
vocals: Curtis Knight
harmony vocals: Jimi Hendrix & unknown
rhythm guitar & 1st solo: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar &  2nd solo: Harry Jensen?
bass: Ace Hall?
drums: Ditto Edwards?

intro
JH?: "Oh."
CK: "Ah here we go."
?: "Hey!"
CK: "Gonna get things underway by a tune that goes like this in the key of G."
?: "Hey."
* cut in tape
?: "Quattro!"

outro
JH?: "Yeah!"

Original version released by Sam The Sham And The Pharaohs in March 1965 on the single "Wooly Bully / Ain't Gonna Move" (MGM K13322). Lonnie Youngblood cut his own solo version of Wooly Bully but isn't audible on this Squires take. The 2nd guitar player takes a solo here so this may be the line-up with Harry Jensen on lead guitar. Curtis` intro seems to indicate that this is the first song of a set, the recording levels are also too high at the start and are very quickly adjusted.


You Got What It Takes
composer: Joe Tex
date: unknown
vocals: Jimi Hendrix & Curtis Knight
tambourine: Ace Hall?
lead guitar: Jimi Hendrix
rhythm guitar: Curtis Knight?
bass: Harry Jensen
drums: George Bragg

intro
CK: "You're being recorded live, we're making an album right here... fabulous Club 20 in Hackensack, New Jersey. We'd like to continue on if we may, and do a tune entitled, Some Boys Say."

JH (ad lib c.0.22): "Go ahead on Harry"
JH (ad lib c.1.42): "Go ahead on George"

Jimi shouts to Harry and George during the song so this must be from the same date as "Come On - Part 1".

Released by Joe Tex on the 45 "You Better Get It / You Got What It Takes" (Dial 45-4003) in February 1965 2.






SOURCES
1 the Rufus Thomas "Walking The Dog" 45 is mentioned in an article about Atlantic Records sales where it's stated that Atlantic had sold 20.000 copies of the disc to distributors after it "...only been getting air play for a week...", Billboard issue 28 September 1963
2 the Joe Tex "You Better Get It / You Got What It Takes" 45 is advertized with a full page ad and reviewed as a new release in Billboard issue of 13 February 1965
3 the Billboard issue of 2 June 1962 lists the Isley Brothers "Twist And Shout" 45 on the front page under the heading "New on the Top 100" at number 84.
4 the Billboard issue of 12 September 1960 has a half page ad for Hank Ballard stating the release date of the "Let's Go, Let's Go, Let's Go" 45 as 10 September 1960.
5 the "Ain't That Peculiar" 45 was reviewed in the "spotlight" -section of Billboard issue of 2 October 1965.
6 the "It Hurts Me Too" 45 appears under the "Top R&B Jockey's Pick-Of-The-Week" -section in Billboard issue 10 April 1965. No flipside or catalog number given.
7 an ad for the "Money" 45 was published in Billboard issue 4 January 1960 stating that the record was a "Smash! Detroit - Chi - St. Louis - Atlanta".
8 a full page ad for "The Beatles` Second Album" appeared in the Billboard issue of 11 April 1964 and a review in the 18 April 1964 issue.
9 reviewed in the Billboard issue of 14 August 1961.
10 the Lee Dorsey 45 "Get Out Of My Life Woman" entered the Billboard Hot 100 -chart for the week ending 1 January 1966 at number 93, published in Billboard issue 1 January 1966.
11 the McCoys 45 "Hang on Sloopy / I Can't Explain it" is advertized with a full page ad ("legit sales 125,000 1 week + 3 days") and enters the Hot 100 -chart at 99 in Billboard issue of 14 August 1965
12 a news item in Billboard issue 4 December 1965 reported: "Capitol unveils a Beatles` single Dec. 1 and an LP five days later... The single is "We Can Work It Out" which is not on the LP."
13 the single "I Got You (I Feel Good) is listed under the header "Top R & B Jockeys' Pick-Of-The-Week" in the Billboard issue of 30 October 1965 so at least promo copies were already out before the end of October. It makes it's first entry on the Cash Box Top 100 singles chart week ending ending November 6, 1965 and was "Predicted to reach the TOP SELLING "RHYTHM & BLUES SINGLES Chart" in Billboard issue 6 November 1965.
14 the "Just A Little Bit" -single entered the Billboard "HOT R & B SIDES" -chart at number 24 in the Billboard issue 1 February 1960
15 listed as a "Top R&B Jockey's Pick-Of-The-Week" for Jerry Thomas of Dallas - Ft. Worth in Billboard issue 13 March 1965
16 "(I can't get no) Satisfaction" is reviewed in the 5 June 1965 issue of Billboard and enters the Billboard Hot 100 chart at number 57 in the 12 June 1965 issue making May 1965 the probable release date.
17 the "Stand By Me" -single is reviewed as a new release in Billboard issue 24 April 1961.
18 The single entered the Billboard "Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles" chart for week ending 3/20/65 at number 28, published in the Billboard issue 20 March 1965 , there's also an ad for the single on the front page.
19 The single was reviewed in the Billboard issue 13 February 1965.
20 Reported as a "regional breakout" for Los Angeles in the Billboard issue 22 June 1963
21 The "Top Selling R&B Singles" -chart in the the Billboard issue 10 October 1966 has the Wilson Pickett single at number 4. It is noted as having been number 2 the previous week but the previous Billboard issue is not available in the online archive.
22 The single was reviewed in the Billboard issue 24 April 1965.
23 Liner notes for the 4 cd B.B.King boxset "The Vintage Years" (Ace ABOXCD 8) released in 2002
24 listed as a new release under "Special Merit Picks" in Billboard issue 27 February 1965. Billboard issue 30 January 1965 also mentions the album under "New Album Releases" but right under that heading follows an explanatory note: "This form is designed to aid dealers in ordering and broadcasters in programming.". Thus the January listing was probably meant for pre-orders and the album was actually in the shops in February.
25 email from John McDermott 28 December 2014
26
27 reviewed under the "Reviews of THIS WEEK`S SINGLES" -section in Billboard issue 16 November 1959
28 reviewed under the "The Billboard Music Popularity Charts" -section in Billboard issue 23 April 1955. The review states that the record was released "three weeks ago". Since Billboard was published roughly a week before it's cover date the single would have been issued in March. Note that "Bo Diddley" is usually listed in discographies as the A-side of the single, it wasn't. The disc master numbers on the label are "7786" for "I'm A Man" and 7788 for "Bo Diddley" indicating "I'm A Man" as the A-side. The 1955 Billboard chart entries are for "I'm A Man", not "Bo Diddley" and as definite proof Billboard 16 April 1955 issue includes an ad by Checker Record Co. for "I`m  A Man" b / w "Bo Diddley" - with "I`m A Man" in larger letters to make absolutely clear that it's the A-side.
29 a "Chess Producing Corporation" ad including the single was published in Billboard issue 23 June 1958
30 a "Chess-Checker Record Co." ad including the single was published in Billboard issue 13 April 1957
31 listed under "New Album Releases" in Billboard issue 20 November 1965
32 reviewed as a new release in Billboard issue 28 November 1964
33 reviewed as a new release in Billboard issue 8 May 1965
34 Billboard issue 29 May 1961 featured a news item about Atlantic handling the distribution for the Satellite 45, the first time that Atlantic distributed another labels product (as opposed to buying / licensing). According to Billboard the single "has been stirring up some action in Memphis", Atlantic would probably have acted rather fast so the single must have been released circa April / May 1961.
35 an ad for the "Mercy, Mercy" 45 appeared in the 15 August 1964 issue of Billboard.
36 the single entered the Billboard "Hot Rhythm & Blues Singles" -chart at number 24 in the 30 January 1965 issue
37 the single entered the Billboard "Honor Roll Of Hits" at number 19 in the 10 November 1958 issue
38 Billboard issue 6 February 1965 includes the 45 under "Singles Reviews" and also features a full page Tamla Motown Records advert which includes the single.
39 listed in Billboard issue 18 April 1964 under "HOT POP Programming Specials"
40 The single entered the Billboard "Hot 100" -chart in the 25 May 1959 issue
41 There are multiple releases of this track on various labels so it's hard to determine which one came first.

Elmore James 45 "Bleeding Heart / It Hurts Me Too" [master numbers ZTSP 98718 / ZTSP 98719] (Enjoy 2015) USA
- this Enjoy 45 does not note the A- and B-sides in any way. Based on the master numbers which are consecutive "Bleeding Heart" was the A-side on this release (the A-side of a single usually has a lower master number than the B-side). I'd guess that this was the first issue of this single. Billboard does not seem to have ever mentioned "Bleeding Heart" so it seems this version of the 45 probably either was a complete flop or was withdrawn very quickly.

Also:
Elmore James 45 "It Hurts Me Too / Bleeding Heart" (Sue Records WI-383) UK
- an UK issue licensed from Enjoy Records. "It Hurts Me Too" is clearly marked as the A-side on the label.

Elmore James 45 "It Hurts Me Too / Pickin` The Blues" [ZTSP 98719 / ZTSP 104841] (Enjoy 2015) USA - released in March / April1965 6.
- this Enjoy 45 does not note the A- and B-sides in any way. Based on the master numbers this is a later re-issue of Enjoy 2015 but with "Pickin` The Blues" replacing "Bleeding Heart". For comparison here are the master numbers for ENJOY 2016 - 2019:

ENJOY 2016 - ZTSP 104805 / ZTSP 104806
ENJOY 2017 - ZTSP 104983 / ZTSP 104984
ENJOY 2018 - ZTSP 104985 / ZTSP 104986
ENJOY 2019 - ZTSP 105559 / ZTSP 105560

So the master number for "Pickin` The Blues", ZTSP 104841, would suggest that this new issue of ENJOY 2015 was released some time after ENJOY 2016. "It Hurts Me Too" probably was the A-side of this release as "Pickin` The Blues" is an instrumental. Billboard report "It Hurts Me Too" ENJOY 2015 during several months in 1965, unfortunately the flipside is never mentioned. Enjoy could have noticed with the first issue of 2015 that the B-side "It Hurts Me Too" was more popular than the A-side, withdrawn the first issue and released 2015 again with "It Hurts Me Too" as the A-side and it's thus likely these Billboard mentions are for the 2nd issue..hence the original 2015 with "Bleeding Heart" as the A-side must have been released sometime before March 1965.

And then "Bleeding Heart" was released again, now with a different catalogue number:
Elmore James 45 "Bleeding Heart / Mean Mistreatin` Mama" [master numbers ZTSP 98718 / ZTSP 105797] (Enjoy 2020) USA

 

CURTIS KNIGHT (& THE SQUIRES)


Pictures

 

Ondine Discotheque
Pictures (scroll down to see them...) probably taken around October / November at the Ondine Discotheque, 59th Street, New York City in 1965.

In August 2003 I had the pleasure of exchanging emails with Jim Reeves who was the DJ & soundman at Ondine's, and thus mixed & DJ'd during Curtis Knight bookings. He also installed the PA system, which he describes on his website www.reevesaudio.com:

"It consisted of a 5 channel Altec 1567a mixer, 3 Altec condenser 21c microphones, and an Altec 100 watt (as big as a house!) amplifier and a pair of Altec column speakers with 2 Thoren's TD-125 turntables for continuous record playing and an American Concertone 1/4'track reversible tape deck forplaying non-stop dance mixes for non critical dance music during the dinning hours. A very sophisticated highly state of the art system for it's time."

See his website for more, he emailed me the following additional info:

Jim Reeves: "From the musical symbols in the background it's clear that it was not Ondine [referring to "unknown location" pictures which I thought were from Ondine's - webmaster]. More probably a porthole, lifesaver, oar or netting would have been in the background. Things from a large sailboat. The decor was simulated after the Olympic sailing vessel Ondine. Other telltales would be: If zoomed out a little, a pair of Altec columns hanging above horizontally. The mics were small cylindrical shaped. Very expensive Altec studio "lipstick" condenser mics.

After the new management (with Brad Pierce) took over, they moved the stage to the south wall. You can see the arched, ship like rafters above on ceiling and the porthole near the guitar on the stand. I wonder if I'm dancing. I'm starting to think that the guy in the white shirt (bottom pic) with the black wavy hair is me dancing with Babbette. I had to have been there when this picture was taken since I was in charge of the shows and music, either in the sound booth to the right or dancing or something.

Ondine was not at all a large venue. There was a 18' to 22'foot bar at the front and a coat check room across from it. Continuing on to the rear was a 25' x 35'x 9'h room with a stage, dance floor? And beyond that, a fairly large kitchen. There were booths around the perimeter of the room. "The Losers" was the house band. They were a funky blues rock pop band. Joe Nessor (bass and vocal), Tony Sal (Guitar and vocal), Brian Keenan (drums) and Russell ??? (guitar) I think.

Yes, those are the speakers, but had them reinstalled there vicariously when they moved the stage. When Brad took over he fired all the staff including me, but when he realized that I was the installer and main discaire (DJ) he rehired me. It cost him a bit to get me back. But in the meantime he had
renovated on his own. He was pretty hip to the scene and brought in The Doors, Buffalo Springfield, the Denims, and the Druids of Stonehenge and the Pilgrims (fully costumed like the Rascals who performed regularly at Harlowe's on 72nd street).

I was told by the owner's that Ondine was a God from the sea (like Odessa) from mythology and a sailboat was named after her and it had won an Olympic competition sometime in the 1900's. '40's, '50's? Brad Pierce of Ondine [later] opened a club in the village called Salvation (and another Salvation II).

The owners of Ondine also owned The Barge, a disco in the Hampton's on Long Island, NY and launched the Young Rascals from there, and also le Club on east 55th Street near the East River. It was posh and totally private and very French, with window booths on different levels and sort of speakeasy-ish entrance. A small peep door would open and you would have to identify yourself to gain entry. It preceded all the New York discos. My mentor had installed their sound system and passed Ondine on to me to do. Later, I have to say '64, "Arthur's", owned by Cybil Burton, (former wife of Richard Burton, if I have my facts straight) was the first public disco (House band - The Fuzzie Bunnies; Sonny and Cher were among the frequenteurs) and then Ondine followed a few weeks after. Then the rest mushroomed up all over Manhattan. I had access to most all the clubs because of my professional involvement in Ondine and Arthur's. I also helped to maintain their sound systems. It was pretty cool for me to be in the " happening circle".

It would have been '65 and Yes, they were called "The Curtis Knight Four-featuring Jimi James". And I
also recall Jimi and I hitting the Brasserie restaurant for cheeseburgers and birds after the clubs closed, several times. (A Brasserie Inside tip; the cheese was inside the burgers! A lesson well learned.) "

In Univibes #16 Kees de Lange wrote about Hendrix's first meeting with the Rolling Stones and offered the following info: He quotes a Hendrix interview done on the 9th of October in 1967 in Paris for "Music Maker" where Jimi says that Mick Jagger tried to get him on tour a year before Chas Chandler found Hendrix. He also quotes a Mick Jagger interview from the 28 January 1967 "Melody Maker" issue where Jagger says that he saw Hendrix a year ago in New York.

Bill Wyman's diary states that the Rolling Stones went to the Ondine discotheque on the 1st November 1965. He also says in his book "Stone Alone" that the Stones went to see Hendrix play on the 2nd of July 1966. In an interview with radio station "Amsterdam FM" on the 22th of October 1992 Curtis Knight said that the Rolling Stones visited Ondine while Curtis & Jimi were playing there.


Jimi Hendrix - guitar, Curtis Knight - vocals, Napoleon Anderson - bass.


Jimi Hendrix - guitar, Curtis Knight - vocals, Napoleon Anderson - bass.

 

 

CURTIS KNIGHT (& THE SQUIRES)


Personnel

The Squires had several line-ups during the period that Hendrix was a member. The band name "Curtis Knight & the Squires" is a pun on Curtis` artist name "Knight". In the middle ages a squire was a Knight's servant / shield bearer / apprentice. Curtis also introduced the band as "the Lovelights" during one of the live recordings (the track "Band Outro"). Musicians appearing on the live & studio recordings done between 1965 - 1967 include:

James Marshall Hendrix (aka Jimmy James aka Jimi Hendrix) - guitar & vocals
Curtis McNear (aka Curtis Knight) - vocals, guitar & tambourine
Harry Jensen - guitar & bass
Lonnie Thomas (aka Lonnie Youngblood) - sax & vocals
Ray Lucas - drums
"Shears" - guitar (participated in the 1967 sessions, unknown if the name is 100% correct)
Marion Booker - drums (often spelled Marlon, which is incorrect)
Ditto Edwards - drums
George Bragg - drums
Nathaniel Edmonds Sr. (aka Nate Edmonds) - keyboards
Ed "Bugs" Gregory - bass
Ace Hall - bass & tambourine
Napoleon Anderson (aka Hank Anderson) - bass
Both names bring up the same tracks at www.bmi.com, so Hank and Napoleon are one and the same person.
This was also confirmed by an email that I received from a friend of Mr. Anderson.
Edward Chalpin (aka Ed Chalpin aka Ed Dantes) - producer
Jerry Simon - producer
Ed Dantes (aka Edward "Ed" Chalpin) - publishing money
Ed Dantes doesn't exist in real life, it's a pseudonym for Ed Chalpin. Doing a search in the BMI song licencing database at www.bmi.com nicely illustrates this fact. The database has linked given names and pseudonyms together, a composer search for "Ed Chalpin" brings up tracks credited to "Ed Dantes" and vice versa. Or search for the Jayne Mansfield track "Suey", the 45 labels credits this to Chalpin, the database credits "Ed Dantes" but a search for Edward Chalpin as composer will include it in the results...the "Ed Dantes" credit is mainly used for the 1967 studio jams, this was apparently a neat way for Chalpin to line up his pockets with the publishing money for these tracks that nobody really "composed".

Here's a fun theory: The main character of the book "the Count of Monte Cristo" is called Edmond Dantes. A synopsis of the book: "Here is the classic tale of 19-year-old Edmond Dantes who on his wedding day is framed for a crime he did not commit. While locked away Edmond learns from another prisoner of a secret treasure on the island of Monte Cristo. Edmond concocts a daring plan to escape and find the treasure. Years later, disguised as a wealthy Count, Edmond returns to his native land to find his enemies and make them pay."

 

CURTIS KNIGHT (& THE SQUIRES)


Pictures
Pictures of the Squires were shot at 5 different live locations, (at least) 2 different studio sessions, and at the Maurice Seymour Studios in New York City.