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LONNIE YOUNGBLOOD

Fakes
Listed here are tracks that have appeared on various albums claiming to be Jimi Hendrix or Youngblood / Hendrix material, but in reality do not contain any involvement by Hendrix. Nor do they feature Lonnie Youngblood but as these fake tracks have often been included on releases containing genuine Youngblood / Hendrix recordings they have become known among collectors as fake Lonnie Youngblood recordings even though that really isn't the case...

These have been here divided into four categories:
1. Re-worked songs
2. New (Herman Hitson) songs
3. "One channel" songs
4. Miscellaneous songs

Most of these "fake" tracks have appeared under several different titles, I've tried to list them here with their real titles (if known) and / or the titles they had on their first "Hendrix" release.

All of the fake tracks were produced and compiled by Johnny Brantley (sometimes with the help of Lee Moses) for release on various "Jimi Hendrix" -lps between the years 1972 - 1982. Some discs contained only fake material, some only genuine early recordings, others were a mix of both and Brantley even put out the first "official" release of the infamous "Scene Club" jam session recording from 1968 featuring Jimi and Jim Morrison.


1. Re-worked songs

Miracle Worker
(Jimmy Norman)
wiped horns, drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, glockenspiel

I'm Gonna Be Good[aka From This Day On]
(Marion Farmer, Edward Lewis, James Lewis)
wiped piano, wiped horns, drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, congas

You Are Too Much For The Human Heart - version 1 [aka Human Heart]
(Lee Moses)
drums, bass, organ, lead guitar, rhythm guitar

You Are Too Much For The Human Heart - version 2 [aka Louisville]
(Lee Moses)
wiped vocals, drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, organ

Feel That Soul [aka Soupbone]
(John Wesley)
drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, organ

All Alone
(John Wesley)
wiped vocals, drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar

So Called Friend
(Jimmy Norman)
wiped horns, drums, bass, piano, rhythm guitar, lead guitar, mumblings "play the blues"

Girl So Fine
(John Wesley)
drums, bass, lead guitar (w/ phasing effect), rhythm guitar, 2nd rhythm guitar, organ

Every Little Bit Hurts
(Jimi Hendrix)
drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, organ

You Say You Love Me [aka Freedom And You]
(John Wesley)
drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, wiped vocals

Writing credits for above tracks have been taken from lp labels. 1

John Wesley seems to be a pseudonym (or the real name?) used by producer Johnny Brantley, a search in the BMI catalog brings exactly the same results for both names (and Johnny Brantley's name is given as "Brantley Johnny W").

Moods
RE-ISSUE FROM 1981 ON PHOENIX 10

These are clearly tracks that have been messed with. Several of these songs originally had vocals, horns or piano on them, and these have mainly been wiped. They can still be heard quietly in the background, probably because of leakage during the original recordings. After wiping some of the original parts new instrumentation, mainly vocal & guitar overdubs, was added to the tracks in order to turn them into "Jimi Hendrix" recordings.

Almost all of these songs were originally released in the USA on the lp "Moods" (Trip Records TLP-9512) circa September 1973.2 The only track that I have found that belongs to this category and was not on "Moods" is "You Are Too Much For The Human Heart - version 2" [aka Louisville] released in the USA in 1981 on the lp "Cosmic Turnaround" (Nutmeg Records NUT-1002).

So far 5 original versions used as the basis for these fake tracks have been found:

The Ohio Players
Soupbone
(John Wesley?)
The basis of the fake Hendrix track "Feel That Soul" is a track by the Ohio Players going by the name "Soupbone". This recording seems to have received the same treatment as the fake Hendrix tracks, the original instruments are mixed very low and new bass & guitar overdubs have been added on top. It could even be a fake Hendrix "out-take" - the original Ohio Players track is buried so deep under new overdubs that releasing this mix of the track on an Ohio Players disc seems completely pointless.

Discovered by Peter Strömbäck it's a small miracle that he did spot it as the original backing track is almost completely inaudible. It can only really be heard during the breaks, at those points in the song one can just make out bits of the original drum & guitar tracks which correspond with the parts audible on the fake Hendrix "Feel That Soul" -version of the track.

"Soupbone" is unlikely to be the correct original title of the song. The Ohio Players have a track called "Alabama Soupbone" which is a completely different song. The lyrics of "Soupbone" include the lines "You gotta gotta gotta gotta gotta feel that soul" and "Do you feel that soul" so it's more likely that "Feel That Soul" is the actual original title of the song. The track is available on the cheapo cd "The Ohio Players Double Play" (Tring International GRF 045) along with tracks from the Ohio Players lps "Observations In Time" and "First Impressions". The lp tracks are in poor quality and clearly lifted from vinyl. "Soupbone" isn't great quality either but it has not been taken from vinyl. This cd is the only physical release that I have been able to find with the track on it.

The fake track "Feel That Soul" is credited to John Wesley on the "Moods" -lp so that may or may not be the correct composer credit for "Soupbone".

Herman Hitson
You Are Too Much For The Human Heart
(Lee Moses)
The fake "Human Heart" is available in two versions, titled mostly either as "Human Heart", "Let Me Go" or "Louisville". Both of these takes are versions of "You Are Too Much For The Human Heart" recorded by Herman Hitson on 1 March 1968. 3 The 45 this track was released on is very rare, and quite popular in soul collecting circles. Originally issued in 1968, it was re-issued in 2000 on a Kent -label compilation cd "Sanctified Soul" (CDKEND 180).

Both "fake" takes sound quite different to the single track, but the song itself is clearly the same, and on one of the "fake" takes faint singing can be heard. The vocals are extremely low, but when you compare them to the single version you are able to match bits of the lyrics. The fake "Human Heart" has a much slower tempo compared to the Hitson single, so it's a different take, not the 45 take with overdubs.

Another fake track, "I'm Gonna Be Good" [aka "From This Day On"], features congas very similar to "Yes You Did", another Hitson 45 produced by Brantley, so it's possible that the fake track "I'm Gonna Be Good" has some kind of connection to Herman Hitson.

At least three solo singles were released by Hitson involving Johnny Brantley and / or Lee Moses:

Herman Hitson
You Are Too Much For The Human Heart (Lee Moses)
/ I Got That Will (Herman Hitson) (Atco 6566) - 7"
Produced by Johnny Brantley, arranged by T.Staff

Herman Hitson
Yes You Did (Marion Farmer, Edward Lewis, James Lewis)
/ Better To Have Loved (Marion Farmer, Edward Lewis, James Lewis) (Minit 32072) - 7"
Produced by Johnny Brantley, arranged by T.Staff

Herman Hitson
Show Some Sign (Herman Hitson)
/ She's A Bad Girl (Bobby Fears, Lee Moses) (Minit 32096) - 7"
Produced by Johnny Brantley, arranged by Lee Moses

Sam Williams
Miracle Worker
(Jimmy Norman)
The fake "Miracle Worker" is the same take as released on the Sam Williams 45 "Miracle Worker" with vocals & horns removed and guitar overdubs added.

Sam Williams
Miracle Worker (Jimmy Norman)
/ So Called Friend (Jimmy Norman) (Uptown 742) - 7"
Produced by Johnny Brantley

Sam Williams
So Called Friend
(Jimmy Norman)
The fake "So Called Friend" is an alternate take of the Sam Williams 45 B-side with horns & vocals wiped and guitar overdubs added (Johnny Brantley also produced a version of "So Called Friend" by Billy LaMont).

Sam Williams
Miracle Worker (Jimmy Norman)
/ So Called Friend (Jimmy Norman) (Uptown 742) - 7"
Produced by Johnny Brantley

Nate Adams
I'm Gonna Be Good
(Marion Farmer, Edward Lewis, James Lewis)
“I’m Gonna Be Good” is the basis for the fake track “From This Day On" (it’s listed with both titles at BMI), released as the B-side of the 45 “Why Is It Taking So Long”. I haven't heard the original track yet, but Gabe Monago (who has this single and provided the scans below) confirmed that it's indeed the original version of the fake track.

Nate Adams
Why Is It Taking So Long (Marion Farmer, Edward Lewis, James Lewis)
/ I'm Gonna Be Good (Marion Farmer, Edward Lewis, James Lewis) " (ATLANTIC 45-2466) - 7"
Produced by Johnny Brantley, arranged by T.Staff

Both sides were recorded in New Jersey on the 20th of October 1967. The full session included (with Atlantic master number listed first): 3

13341 Yes You Did
13342 I’m Gonna Be Good
13343 Why Is It Taking So Long
13344 A Fool For You
13345 Sophisticated Alabama Soup Bone

Rest of the tracks remain unreleased, although “Yes You Did” (from acetate?) is in the possession of at least one soul collector / dj. The Atlantic logs don’t list any personnel. Herman Hitson also released a version of "Yes You Did" on Minit 32072 and Marion Farmer his own version of “Sophisticated Alabama Soup Bone” on Tower 417. Neither recording was used as the basis for any of the fake tracks.

Side A

Side B

The composers credited on the "Moods" lp have corresponded with all of the original versions that have been discovered so far. Unfortunately it looks like all the remaining unidentified fakes have either been credited to John Wesley aka Johnny Brantley or Jimi Hendrix which might indicate that they were unreleased tracks that Brantley took composing credits for when he compiled his "Jimi Hendrix" lps. If this is indeed the case then it might be very hard to identify the remaining original recordings used as basis for the fakes.


2. New (Herman Hitson) songs

A Mumblin' Word
(Lee Moses)
drums, bass, lead guitar, vocal mumblings "get on down" at the end

Get Down
(Lee Moses)
drums, bass, lead guitar, mumblings "get down now etc."

Free Spirit
(Herman Hitson, Lee Moses)
vocals, drums, bass, lead guitar

House Of The Rising Sun
(Woody Guthrie)
drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, organ

Let The God Sing
(Herman Hitson)
vocals, drums, bass, two lead guitars, organ

Suspicious
(Herman Hitson, Johnny Brantley)
vocals "can you hear me knocking baby", drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar

Bring My Baby Back
(Herman Hitson, Johnny Brantley)
vocals "I love my babe", drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar

Voice In The Wind
(Herman Hitson, Johnny Brantley)
vocals, drums, bass, two lead guitars

Hey Leroy [aka Hey, Leroy, Your Mama's Callin' You]
(James Castor, Johnny Pruitt)
two vocals, drums, bass, lead guitar, organ

Good Feeling
(Jimi Hendrix, Herman Hitson)
vocals "playing for the one in the wheelchair", drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, organ

Good Times [aka Let Me Thrill Your Soul]
(Jimi Hendrix, Herman Hitson)
vocals "let the good time roll, let me thrill your soul", drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar

Something You Got
(Chris Kenner)
vocals, drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, organ

Hot Trigger
(Jimi Hendrix, Herman Hitson)
drums, bass, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, organ

Writing credits for above tracks have been taken directly from the original lp releases. 4

These tracks are all Herman Hitson (aka Hermon Hitson and, according to BMI, Baaqar Hermon Aleem Abu) recordings. According to Hitson these tracks were recorded for a solo album that was to be called "Free Spirit". The tracks were produced by Johnny Brantley and Lee Moses, with Moses also sharing lead vocals on "Hey Leroy". Herman Hitson has variously stated that he did all of the guitar playing and vocals on these tracks, that Jimi had a "small part" in "some of the material" and that he recorded these together with Hendrix. He has however always maintained that the recordings were done for his solo album in 1966. All of the songs were of course instead released by Brantley as Jimi Hendrix recordings. 5

At least one of the tracks does have Hendrix on it - a part of the (completely unrelated) Lonnie Youngblood track "Go Go Shoes" has been edited to the start of "Good Feeling".

In a testimony given by Youngblood in a 1986 court hearing during the case Ed Chalpin vs. Audiofidelity he identified the guitar player on "I Love My Baby" (aka "Bring My Baby Back", listen to the track on YouTube) as an imitator named "Mike" from Baltimore (the lp incorrectly transcribed as "Cosmic Cloud" is in fact the lp "Cosmic Turnaround"):

Q. Now, still looking at the Cosmic Cloud record on the Nutmeg label distributed by Audio Fidelity, which was marked as Exhibit 6, have you ever heard, "I love my baby"?
A. I don't know.
Q. On side two?
A. I couldn't say unless I heard it.
Q. Okay. This is the third cut on side two that I am now playing entitled on the label, "I love my baby."
(Record played)
Q. What can you tell us about that one?
A. It is a track with an imitator on it.
Q. You say an imitator?
A. Yes
Q. How do you know that?
A. Because I know it is not Hendrix.
I know who the imitator is.
Q. Who is the imitator?
A. A young kid out of Baltimore named Mike. I don't know his last name.
Q. Why do you know it's Mike?
A. I know how Mike plays, I know his flavours. I am [next page of the transcript is missing]

If "Mike" does play on the track in question he probably plays on several (or all) of the Hitson tracks as most of these clearly feature the same guitar player. Could he also have played on other fakes or provided overdubs to the material on "Two Great Experiences"? Lonnie does not appear on the Hitson tracks so he might have worked with "Mike" on other occasions (since he says that he is familiar with his style). Until someone comes up with his full name "Mike" remains a mystery missing person. 6

"Good Times" is a jam based on "Come On (pt. 1)" by Earl King. "Hey Leroy" is based on "Hey, Leroy, Your Mama's Callin' You", a single produced by Johnny Brantley released by Jimmy Castor in November 1966 (Smash S-2069). 7 "Something You Got" is a cover of a song originally recorded by Chris Kenner (also covered by Curtis Knight & the Squires).

According to Hitson the track "Hot Trigger" was recorded together with Jimi in 1966 and named after the songs drummer called "Trigger". 5 This probably refers to Eddie B. Trigger. Hitson worked together with Lee Moses, March "Eddie" Maxey Jr. and Eddie B. Trigger on the lp "Truth" by King Hannibal, released in 1973 8

The musicians possibly playing on these "fake" Herman Hitson tracks : 9

Herman Hitson - guitar & vocals
"Mike" - guitar?
Lee Moses - organ (and vocals on "Hey Leroy")
Alonzo "Yogie" Taylor - bass
March "Eddie" Maxey Jr. - drums
Eddie B. Trigger - drums

These supposed 1966 Hitson / Hendrix recordings were first released in 1972-1973 on the following lps:
"In The Beginning" (Shout Records Inc. SLP-502) USA - 1972
"Rare Hendrix" (Trip Records TLP-9500) USA - July 1972 10
"Moods" (Trip Records TLP-9512) USA - September 1973 2


3. "One channel" songs

Edda Mae (aka Find Someone To Love)
Find Someone (aka The Man That I Am)
Be My Baby (aka Birth Of A Playboy)
Everything You Get (aka Nobody Can Save Me)
Nightlife

All of these "one channel" fake tracks first appeared on the "Jimi Hendrix" -lp "Kaleidoscope" (Nutmeg NUT-1003) released in the USA in 1982. They all have been mixed in the same odd way with the original backing track in the right channel and loud buzzing and guitar overdubs in the left channel. Apart from "Everything You Get" that is, this one track sounds otherwise exactly like the others but has been mixed in mono.

So far 4 original versions used as the basis for these fake tracks have been found:

The Ohio Players
Find Someone To Love
(Marshall Jones, Gregory Webster, Leroy Bonner, Andrew Noland, Ralph Middlebrooks, Dutch Robinson)
The fake track "Edda Mae" is based on the Ohio Players track "Find Someone To Love" released on the flip of the single "Over The Rainbow" (Capitol 2523), and on the lps "Observations In Time" (Capitol LP ST-192) and "First Impressions" (Trip TLP-8029). The vocals from the original The Ohio Players recording have been wiped, the remaining backing track has been mixed to the right channel and guitar (left channel) and piano (right channel) overdubs have been added. Thanks to Rob Pietrangeli for spotting this one.

The Ohio Players
The Man That I Am

(Marshall Jones, Gregory Webster, Leroy Bonner, Clarence Satchell, Ralph Middlebrooks, Dutch Robinson)
The fake track "Find Someone" is based on a track called "The Man That I Am" released on the Ohio Players lp "Observations In Time" (Capitol LP ST-192). Same recipe with guitar overdubs in the left channel and the original track with vocals wiped on the right.

The Chosen Few

Birth Of A Playboy
(Eddie Johnson, Gerald Perry)
The original version of the fake track "Be My Baby" is titled "Birth Of A Playboy" released both on the Johnny Brantley produced the Chosen Few -lp "Taking All The Love I Can" (Maple Records M-6000) and the 45 "Taking All The Love I Can / Birth Of A Playboy" (Maple Records 1000). The vocals on the original have been wiped on the fake, the horns have been mixed down and new vocals & a 2nd guitar track has been added. Thanks to Peter Strömbäck for identifying this track.

The Chosen Few

Nobody Can Save Me
(Gerald Perry, James Wicker)
The original version of the fake track "Everything You Get" is titled "Nobody Can Save Me" released on the Johnny Brantley produced the Chosen Few -lp "Taking All The Love I Can" (Maple Records M-6000). The vocals on the original have been wiped on the fake, occasional new vocals and a new 2nd guitar track have been added. The track is very distorted and runs much slower than the original. "Everything You Get" is in mono but sounds like it probably would have the same instrument separation as the others if it were stereo as the guitar is well above the other instruments and sounds very similar to the other tracks. Thanks to Peter Strömbäck for identifying this track.

Unknown
Nightlife
The original version of the fake track "Nightlife" is still unknown but very likely to be Johnny Brantley production. "Nightlife" is a fast 1970s funk/disco instrumental with some occasional spoken vocals (later overdubs?).


4. Miscellaneous songs


Jimmy Norman: Gangster Of Love
Billy LaMont: Young Generation
Unknown: You Got It

These songs also pop up on various "Hendrix" albums but don't fit the description of the songs in the previous three categories. They aren't really "fake", just completely unrelated recordings with no involvement by Jimi but still included on various "Jimi Hendrix" lps.

Jimmy Norman
Gangster Of Love
(Johnny "Guitar" Watson)
This track is performed by Jimmy Norman, originally released on the single "Gangster Of Love (part 1) / Gangster Of Love (part 2)" on JOSIE 45-994 in or shortly after March 1968, arranged by Ed Bland, produced by Johnny Brantley for Vidalia Productions. This recording seems to have wah wah on the guitar, so that automatically rules out Hendrix, as (once more with feeling) the effect wasn't available until 1967. First "fake" Hendrix lp release probably on the lp "Before London" (ACCORD SN-7101) released in the USA in 1980.

The original Johnny "Guitar" Watson version of this song (also known as "Love Bandit") was produced by Bumps Blackwell and released on Keen Records in 1958.

Billy LaMont
Young Generation
(Johnny Brantley?)
Peter Strömbäck spotted what seems to be either the original version or an alternate take of this track called "Row Your Boat". The song is included on the (apparently digital download only) compilation "Billy LaMont - Sweet Thang: Fine R&B Sides". The track as included on the compilation has been taken from vinyl, I have been unable to find any original 45 release for this track or indeed any reference to it at all other than this compilation. Either the 45 is extremely rare, promo only, an unissued acetate or it was originally released under a different title. We do however now have two versions of the same song with different lyrics.

The female backing singers on "Young Generation" are actually singing "row your boat" plus the "Row Your Boat" -lead vocals are only partially wiped and still occasionally audible so the "Row Your Boat" -version definitely predates the "Young Generation" -version. First "fake" Hendrix lp release for "Young Generation" probably on the lp "Cosmic Feeling" (ACCORD SN-7139) released in the USA in 1981. The lp label credits Brantley as the composer of the track.

Unknown
You got it
(composer ?)
A fusion jazz -ish instrumental by an unknown artist / band, sounds like a late 70s recording. First released in the USA on the LP "Kaleidoscope" (Nutmeg NUT-1003) in 1982.

 

SOURCES
1 The composing credits listed are taken from the Phoenix 10 -label issue of "Moods", the original Trip Records -issue does not list writing credits. The "Jimi Hendrix" -credit for "Every Little Bit Hurts" is debatable but that's how the lp label lists it.

2 The "Moods" lp was reviewed in Billboard issue 6 October 1973 under "Top Album Picks":
"JIMI HENDRIX - Moods, Trip, TLP 9512 (Springboard). A vintage sample of precise guitar work from this rock virtuoso. The technical quality of the recording proves to be a severe detriment to this otherwise flawless effort. These are instrumental cuts made in New York in 1966. Best cuts: "Mumbling Word," "Girl So Fine.""

3 information taken from the book "Atlantic Records Discography Vols. 1 & 2" (compiled by Michel Ruppli)

4 The composer credits listed are taken from the Shout Records issue of "In The Beginning", the Phoenix 10 issue of "Moods" (the original Trip Records -issue does not list writing credits) and the Trip "Superpak" 2 lp repackaging of "Rare Hendrix" and "Roots Of Hendrix" (The original Trip issue of "Rare Hendrix" does not list writing credits). The "Jimi Hendrix" -writing credits for "Good Feeling", "Good Times" and "Hot Trigger" are debatable but that's what the lp labels list for the tracks. "Good Feeling" does have Jimi's guitar playing from "Go Go Shoes" edited in at the start so the writing credit there might be justified.

5 Information taken from: the Herman Hitson website at www.atlantanorthernsoul.com, now offline, a message from Herman Hitson posted to the Southernsoul Yahoo-group https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/southernsoul/conversations/topics/48533 and a filmed live Herman Hitson performance from circa 2006 uploaded on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwLm64W2VWk&spfreload=10) where he explained the origins of the track "Hot Trigger": "That was a song Hendrix and I did together me and Jimi Hendrix we did that in, eh, 66. And it's called, we had a drummer then called "Trigger", (it was thus?) named "Hot Trigger"." Herman Hitson played on the lp "Truth" by King Hannibal (aka Mighty Hannibal) together with Lee Moses and drummer Eddie B. Trigger, very likely the "Trigger" that he refers to.

6 Part of Lonnie Youngblood's testimony transcript from the Audiofidelity case in 1986, unfortunately incomplete - courtesy of Ed Chalpin Papers, Library and Archives, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

7 The Jimmy Castor 45 "Hey, Leroy, Your Mama´s Callin`You / Ham Hocks Espanol" (Smash S-2069) was listed in Billboard issue 3 December 1966 under "Spotlights - Predicted to reach the HOT 100 Chart"

8 "Truth" by King Hannibal (aka Mighty Hannibal) released in 1973 (Aware General Record Corp. AWLP 1001)

9 A YouTube video of "Hot Trigger" uploaded by CitizenXYZ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3YGhYOuWz8) states that the uploader contacted Hitson and asked for more information. Hitson replied (contradicted himself) that "Hendrix does not appear on this instrumental track called "Suspicious/Hot Trigger." and that ""Free Spirit" sessions included the following players: Hermon Hitson on Guitars, Lee Moses on Keys, Alonzo "Yogie" Taylor on Bass, and Eddie Maxey on drums. He also mentioned another drummer nicknamed "Trigger" who played on the Hot Trigger track.".

10 The "Rare Hendrix" lp was reviewed in Billboard issue 22 July 1972 under "Special Merit Picks":
JIMI HENDRIX - Rare Hendrix. Flip TLP 9500
This is another set of early cuts from Hendrix, mainly in the blues vein. While most of the songs are basic and not as flashy as his later recordings, the hints of things to come are still here. His guitar prowess is especially noticeable on "Hot Trigger," "Good Feeling" and "Go Go Shoes, Part 1 and 2," It's always interesting to trace the roots of a great artist and Hendrix fans will delight in this collection.